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6 Countries that are Ideal for South Africans to Live in

Many South Africans are thinking of leaving South Africa. Although things might be looking slightly brighter with our new president, Cyril Ramaphosa, the future is still very uncertain in South Africa.

A good reason to emigrate is to seek a more stable government. However, there are various reasons to leave, such as:

  • Better career options
  • Avoiding rising crime and increasing corruption
  • Access to higher education standards

This article incorporates the following indexes: World Justice Project’s Rule of Law Index, the World Bank’s Governance Index, the 2017 Social Progress Index* and the 2017 Global Peace Index.

If you’re one of those South Africans who’s considering to leave the country, here is a list of six countries where your future would be much more promising.

Denmark

Nyhavn, Copenhagen, Denmark

Denmark is often reported to be the happiest country in the world, although it has dropped to the second place on last year’s World Happiness rankings.

Moreover, in Denmark, almost 100% of its people’s basic human needs are met, according to the 2017 Social Progress Index. This means that if you move to Denmark, you are guaranteed to have access to things like basic medical care and quality water and sanitation.

New Zealand

In New Zealand (NZ), a politically stable country, the government looks after its citizens’ needs very well. Hundred percent of people who live here have access to water and sanitation, while 99 percent have access to nutrition and basic medical care.

NZ is a very safe country: There are very little crime and violence. In fact, the 2017 Global Peace Index rated NZ the world’s second safest country. South Africa came in 123rd.

As for the weather, “like South Africa, New Zealand has a temperate climate much influenced by the seas that surround [them]”, says NZ’s Immigration Office. NZ gets colder the further south you go.

Canada

Although Canada might seem expensive, it is actually cheaper to immigrate to Canada than other countries such as Australia, according to Canada Abroad. Additionally, with the new online Express Entry system, you can complete your application in eight months.

Compared with America, Canada’s political stability is higher and there is less violence.

In terms of the Index scores, Canada comes close to many of the Scandinavian countries in its near-perfect scores, including access to nutrition and medical care, as well as to basic knowledge and personal rights.

Norway

Furthermore, Norway ranked highest in standard of living and education on the United Nations’ annual Human Development Report last year. The country’s average life expectancy is also the highest – 82 years.

The country’s thriving economy is firmly rooted in its oil and gas industry, fisheries, and traditional industry.

Botswana

The country’s economy is stable and has been growing steadily for years. Furthermore, the national income from diamond mining has been fairly well spread throughout the country.

The capital city, Gaborone, is a modern and fast-growing city. It is also diverse and safe, with both public and private medical facilities.

Japan

If you’d like to move to Asia, Japan would be your best bet.

When it comes to overall government effectiveness, rule of law and political stability, the island nation ranked highest in Asia for by the World Bank.

It is also the best Asian nation in terms of access to basic knowledge, water and sanitation, and nutrition and medical care, according to the Social Progress Index.

Tokyo, the financial and political capital of Japan, is a great city to live in. The mix of high-technology and tradition is fascinating. While Tokyo is large and heavily populated, there is an abundance of greenery in some parts. Other benefits include the low crime rate and the amazing public transportation system.

*Social Progress Index: An aggregate index of social and environmental indicators that capture three dimensions of social progress: Basic Human Needs, Foundations of Wellbeing, and Opportunity.

This Post Has 4 Comments

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